November 2017 Reading Wrap

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Considering I managed to read many short stories and did a lot of writing in November, I'm amazed I managed to read this many books. With Christmas coming and some unexpected big expenses, I had to cut my book budget so, for the first time, I took advantage of my local library. I love being able to reserve books online and browse through their selection and not have to stress about money! Pretty sweet things, those libraries. I'm sorry I didn't appreciate them fully before.

Harry Potter & The Chamber of Secrets
Harry Potter & The Prisoner of Azkaban - JK Rowling

Josh only read the first Harry Potter way back when he was a kid, so we've been slowly going through the Jim Dale audiobooks for his enjoyment and it's so much fun! We'll be doing a lot of driving for the holidays and as we go about shopping, so it's a fun way to enjoy the drives. I love how much Josh is enjoying himself and after we read each book, we watch the movie and he gets so into all the little details. Sharing a world you love with someone you love is a lot of fun. It seems I always end up reading Harry Potter around Christmastime and it just feels so cozy.
★★★★★

The Song of Achilles - Madeline Miller
A friend from the bookstore recommended this to customers and since I had a childhood obsession with Greek mythology, I had to give it a go! I'm so glad I did. This book took me right back to that childhood fascination and I was immediately hooked on this complex love story amidst a long and bitter war. Though this is fiction, the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus felt incredibly real and human, with jealousies and egos and disagreements amidst passionate love and deep friendship. If you're looking for a good escape read or listen, I highly recommend The Song of Achilles. 
★★★★☆

The Power - Naomi Alderman
I'd been anticipating this dystopian fiction ever since it made the Bailey's Prize list and I snatched it up as soon as I could (thanks Book of the Month!). Alderman fed into why I love dystopian novels as she turns everything we know upside down and lets us imagine a different future where, in this case, women have all the power after they learn to harness the physical electric energy within them. I didn't realize how much patriarchy was ingrained in me as I tried to imagine men relying so heavily on their female counterparts and women rising to the extremes that give them control over men's bodies. Unfortunately I didn't love it as much as I wanted to, as the narrative style felt a little jumbled and much of it contrived. I struggled with the middle section, but tore through the first and last sections and finished with quite the increased heart rate. It's an intense, fast-paced book that gives you a lot to think about!
★★★★☆

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine - Gail Honeyman
For the entire summer, I felt like I saw this book all over and people were recommending it up the wazoo. So I assumed it was a light summer read. It was not. Think "A Man Called Ove" but much darker. I don't think I thought it was as funny as others thought it was. Yes, there were moments I laughed, but once secrets were revealed, I felt a bit blindsided and couldn't find the humor anymore. BUT. I shouldn't judge books based on my preconceived notions. Honeyman sheds some light on tougher subjects and gives us a glimpse into the people around us who may not act the way we want or be as kind as we expect. I enjoyed this book and would recommend the audiobook for the fun accents with a talented performer. Well done, just be prepared.
★★★★☆

A Kind of Freedom - Margaret Wilkerson Sexton
I'm rather surprised I haven't heard more about this book. Spanning three generations, "A Kind of Freedom" gives readers a glimpse of the ongoing effects of Jim Crow on one family in New Orleans. Each sharing their own unique story, the experiences of Evelyn, her daughter Jackie, and grandson T.C. broke my heart and taught me so much about issues I'll never face. If you enjoyed Yaa Gyasi's "Homegoing" and survived her never-ending cycle of building up and tearing down your home, you will likely appreciate Margaret Wilkerson Sexton's debut. I look forward to her work in the future!
★★★★☆

Asking For It - Louise O'Neill
This book is quite literally the stuff of my nightmares and one of the scariest books I've read. I knew it would be rough going in. I didn't select this book for entertainment, I read it for education. And in a way, this was one of the most educational books I've read about rrape becaues it really challenged me. Main character Emma is not a sympathetic character. She's a mean girl, shallow, vain and beautiful, who wants to prove her beauty by getting attention from men. And she doesn't stick up for or believe a friend who was sexually assaulted. So when Emma gets raped herself, it's hard to put yourself in her shoes and be on her side. O'Neill does not make this story easy for you to swallow. There are no neat and tidy happy endings (as there never are for victims of rape). She doesn't sugarcoat it. She's an amazing author for bravely penning this story and I'm grateful she's bringing these issues into light. Read at your own risk. It's rough.
★★★★☆

New People - Danzy Senna
I don't know any other author that gives me as complicated emotions as Danzy Senna. Last year I read her collection of short stories "You Are Free" and while I enjoyed her prose and social commentary, I found many of the characters completely detestable. But I'd heard good things about "New People" so I decided to give it a go! And once again, I was hooked and laughing at the snarky social commentary, but absolutely hating the characters and screaming at their decisions (which made it oddly fun?). I'd say I hated this book, but I kept picking it up after deciding I was done and I feel so strongly about it so... If you read it, let's discuss these crazy people.
★★★☆☆